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Post Archive
2018 (0)2012 (8)
August (1)

Happy Birthday, Julia!
Wednesday, August 15, 2012
May (1)

EMR - Electronic Medical Records
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
April (1)

Step 1 - Shoot myself
Thursday, April 5, 2012
March (1)

Dinner Dare, pt 1
Monday, March 19, 2012
January (4)

Who's Got It Better Than Us?
Saturday, January 14, 2012

Tasting Menu - January 11, 2012
Wednesday, January 11, 2012

Food Labeling
Friday, January 6, 2012

Filtering - That Alfredo Guy...
Wednesday, January 4, 2012
2011 (28)
December (1)

So Unbelievably Mad Right Now.
Tuesday, December 6, 2011
November (2)

33 Years of Destroying Closet Doors
Monday, November 28, 2011

Filtering - Sous Vide
Wednesday, November 9, 2011
September (3)

DADT & An awesome video.
Tuesday, September 20, 2011

Hungry
Friday, September 16, 2011

Defending Serena
Monday, September 12, 2011
August (3)

Fair Compensation
Wednesday, August 17, 2011

Tasting Menu - August 10, 2011
Wednesday, August 10, 2011

Tasting Menu - August 3, 2011
Wednesday, August 3, 2011
July (5)

Tasting Menu - July 27, 2011
Wednesday, July 27, 2011

A Thrill, A Rush, A Change of Plans
Thursday, July 21, 2011

Tasting Menu - July 20, 2011
Wednesday, July 20, 2011

Feeding Controversy
Sunday, July 10, 2011

Avoiding Taxes
Tuesday, July 5, 2011
June (1)

Drunk Tennis
Monday, June 20, 2011
May (2)

I Want An Empty Waiting Room
Tuesday, May 31, 2011

About time!
Tuesday, May 24, 2011
April (2)

The Things I've Learned (so far)...
Thursday, April 21, 2011

Love Sucks, Play Hard.
Thursday, April 7, 2011
March (5)

School Lunches
Thursday, March 17, 2011

We Interrupt Your Regularly Scheduled Food Science Blog For...
Friday, March 11, 2011

But You're A Med Student!
Tuesday, March 8, 2011

Filtering - Equipment
Friday, March 4, 2011

Blurring The Lines - Part I
Thursday, March 3, 2011
February (2)

The Future of Food...?
Thursday, February 3, 2011

My Biggest Mistake - Oenology Edition
Tuesday, February 1, 2011
January (2)

Filtering - Maillard, Water & Errata
Tuesday, January 25, 2011

Filtering - Saucing It Up
Tuesday, January 11, 2011
2010 (4)
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Blogger Profile

JaySeeDub
School of Medicine
Dub C Med School CA USA

A med & grad student who used to work the line in LA, NYC, SF and Napa talking about the science of cooking and cooking with science. Harold McGee's On Food And Cooking - The Science and Lore of the Kitchen never satisfied my kitchen curiosity and more than one Chef grew exasperated with my asking "Why?" I'll try to stay on topic, but you may see a kvetch or two about the school & hospital.

My posts are presented as opinion and commentary and do not represent the views of LabSpaces Productions, LLC, my employer, or my educational institution.

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Recent Comments
Comment by BeckonsAttore in EMR - Electronic Medical Records

Well, so emr software has it's problems, not like making them public wouldn't cause them any more trouble as it normally would in a paranoid mind, as this yannisguerra's perspective here. I've delv. . .Read More
Aug 08, 2013, 9:35am
Comment by Brian Krueger, PhD in Happy Birthday, Julia!

I'd gladly take on that burden if you were my roomie ;) . . .Read More
Aug 15, 2012, 4:25pm
Comment by JaySeeDub in Happy Birthday, Julia!

If it makes you feel any better, it could be worse. My roommates complain about expanding waistlines. . . .Read More
Aug 15, 2012, 2:33pm
Comment by Brian Krueger, PhD in Happy Birthday, Julia!

Your posts always make me so hungry and its 9am! I saw that amazon now has reruns of "The French Chef" available for streaming.  It made me want to go back and check some of them out.  I remember. . .Read More
Aug 15, 2012, 8:15am
Comment by yannisguerra in EMR - Electronic Medical Records

I feel your pain. It is really bad. Even worse when half of those pages are non important informations (like 5 copies of the same lab, including who ordered it, when, where, etc) So wastefu. . .Read More
May 10, 2012, 6:56pm
Wednesday, November 9, 2011

I feel really bad for leaving readers in a lurch. I think I may have taken on a bit more than I could handle these past few weeks. But, I did run across this really cool article on MAKE on how to make your own immersion circulator. They call it a "sous vide machine," which is fine. The upside is that it costs about $75 to make. Versus spending $400 for the "SousVide Supreme." And anyone with a lab catalog handy can tell you how much a new immersion circulator or water bath can cost. About a grand. Starting. Unless you know of a lab closing that you'd feel comfortable snagging. Not that I'd ever condone or suggest theft.

The absolute great thing about a circulator is that it maintains a constant temperature. There is no fluctuation. There is no overcooking. You can stick your food in a vacuum sealed bag and let it sit at temperature for several hours. It will maintain that temperature. Want roast beef for dinner, but don't want to wait 2-3 hours for it to cook in the oven? Pop it in a vacuum bag in the bath before you leave for work, even better the night before, with the bath set to 55C/130F. When you get home, get a pan smoking hot on the stove and quickly sear on all sides until it's uniformly browned. Presto. Perfectly medium rare roast beef.

A few other applications tend to get overlooked by beginners with their first circulator. They see "can hold temperature." But they don't realize just what that means. Going back to the roast beef, let's say you threw salt and pepper on the meat before putting it in the vacuum bag. Great. Seasoned. But what if you went a step further? A cup of olive oil, a couple cloves of garlic, some sliced fennel, and a bay leaf. Between vacuum sealing and the immersion circulator that roast beef just had its flavor amplified. The vacuum can help push a lot of those flavors into the meat, and the steady temperature means the proteins in the meat aren't allowed to toughen up prematurely, meaning the tissues are still loose. And will take in some of those flavor compounds.

Another application is antiseptic. I'll wager most of my readers have had a micro class. But for those that haven't, typically you kill unwanted pathogens by subjecting them to high heat over a short period of time. A typical autoclave uses steam, since steam can get hotter than liquid water. The steam is under high pressure and the entire thing runs for about 15-20 minutes at 121C. You can use higher temperatures and lower times. And the autoclave kills most things. The great thing about an autoclave is that since it uses steam it is faster than dry air. But you can also go in reverse to kill bacteria. Lower temperature for a longer period of time. Salmonella, for example, can be killed at 55C for 1 hour. So think about that one for a while. No more dry, rubbery chicken. No more limp, grey and flaccid pork chops. No more burned steaks. No more overcooked and rubbery eggs.

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