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Sparrows identify 'troublemakers' from innocent birds
Song sparrows are able to identify troublemakers by eavesdropping on them, scientists have found. A study has shown that the birds can tell "who started it" in a neighbouring squabble over territory, even if they are not directly involved.
Source: BBC News
Posted on: Monday, Oct 18, 2010, 8:41am
Views: 1450
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Washington University
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 8:28 pm CDT

These birds are simply making sure their neighbors are of good breed and not bringing the neighborhood down!  I wonder if they communicate about where the hottest food spots are?



JanedeLartigue
UC Davis
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 8:51 pm CDT

I think that we are learning that birds are far more intelligent than we give them credit for.  I saw something on PBS that showed that crows can recognize a person that has aggrevated them in the past, AND pass this knowledge to their offspring even if the offspring has never seen the person.  They also use tools!  They are very intelligent.  Therefore it does not surprise me that sparrows are also more intelligent than we originally thought.



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Washington University
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 11:32 pm CDT

Quoth the raven, "nevermore"!  ~Poe



Nikkilina
Washington University School of Medicine
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 11:34 pm CDT

People have used birds as messengers before, and parrots can learn to mimic. I think Jane's right that birds are quite intellegent.



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Washington University
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 11:35 pm CDT

You know I am not aware of any other studies that show any distinct communication in bird behavior, like we see in bees to communicate.



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Washington University
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 11:38 pm CDT

Very true.  I didnt consider that!



Nikkilina
Washington University School of Medicine
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Sun, Oct 31, 2010, 11:40 pm CDT

Jane pointed out the crows teaching their young. I read the article that she was mentioning about the crows working with tools. They are extremely smart.


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