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Press Release
Gender gap in physics exams reduced by simple writing exercises


Thanks to University of Colorado at Boulder for this article.

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Psycasm
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Fri, Nov 26, 2010, 8:00 pm CST
This has been known for years... I'm not sure what this study is doing that's new?

Brian Krueger, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center
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Fri, Nov 26, 2010, 8:36 pm CST

How'd it get published in science? 2 different places sent out a press release for it.  Maybe this deserves a blog post analysis :)


Jason Goldman
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Sat, Nov 27, 2010, 3:57 am CST

I think its been known for years with respect to race-based stereotype threat, but I haven't seen it yet for gender-based stereotype threat.


biochem belle
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Sat, Nov 27, 2010, 4:59 am CST

This is way outside my field, so I definitely won't speak to its novelty or quality. However, I did read Ed Yong's post on it, and it seems pretty interesting, at least in terms of leveling the field in STEM.


Jason Goldman
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Sat, Nov 27, 2010, 4:40 pm CST

Well, in physics at least. Let's see it replicated in biology, chemistry, neuroscience, engineering, psychology, computer science, etc etc etc before we talk about STEM more generally :-)


biochem belle
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Sun, Nov 28, 2010, 7:20 am CST

Jason Goldman said:

Well, in physics at least. Let's see it replicated in biology, chemistry, neuroscience, engineering, psychology, computer science, etc etc etc before we talk about STEM more generally :-)

Excellent point, Jason :)

 


Gerty-Z
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Mon, Nov 29, 2010, 11:39 pm CST

This is so freaking easy I don't know why everyone doesn't do it all the time. What would be the downside?

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