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Evie
The Bat Cave EAR

Evie is an aeorspace engineer and will blog about current events in various fields including but not limited to: Space, Astronomy, Genetics, Biology, Green Energy, Neuroscience, Physics, Quantum Physics, Evolution, Environmental issues, Engineering.. Pretty much anything and everything that catches her eye. Stay tuned! Thoughts, comments, requests – always welcomed!

My posts are presented as opinion and commentary and do not represent the views of LabSpaces Productions, LLC, my employer, or my educational institution.

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What a waist of time. Nothing new for curious people. I can tell the guy is into video gaming a lot. Good graphics and scientific language. Using just that, does not mean it is going to be a good m. . .Read More
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Everyone keeps taking about it but no one does nothing. This mission to clear ll the space junk would cost billions but this should be something that needs to be undertaken by all the countries col. . .Read More
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  Buddha had revealed in his teaching more than 2500 years ago that the sense of self is an illusion created by the mind. many buddhist suttas which recorded the teachings of the B. . .Read More
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Awesome Stuff
Thursday, July 7, 2011

NASA Space Shuttle lift off!It would seem as though the end of an era is upon us. Tomorrow, will be the last scheduled launch of the NASA Space Shuttle. Or at least, that's what the current plan says. Never know with that Florida weather. Regardless of the date, there is only one mission left in the old bird. After which, NASA will recall it's vehicles, and the shuttle will be retired. For good.

I'm not typically one who cares much about so called historical events. However, I do find myself thinking: 'Awww.. no more shuttle.. Awwww'. Yes, there are 2 'Aww's in there. I'm as surprised as you are.


Being the space nut that I am, I spent much of my childhood day dreaming about what it would be like to take a ride up to space in that thing. So much so, that I in fact became the first person to land on the newly repaved landing strip runway at Cape Canaveral.

Kennedy Space Center Visitor ComplexIt was back in the early 80's. My family and I flew to FL to spend the summer with my grandma. During our stay, we took a road trip up to the Cape, and the eager little toddler that I was got on a facility tour bus with the big kids. My parents came along too. The bus took us all around the complex. No I don't remember any of this, but I do have pictures (which will be posted here as soon as my mom comes across them and scans and emails them to me).

Tour bus!Anyway, there we were, enjoying our visit to the great Kennedy Space Center, soaking up every word our tour guide had to offer. At some point during the tour, the bus stopped, and let us all off. We were parked on the landing strip the shuttle was to use on its return to Earth.

As soon as I set foot off that bus, and saw all that open space, I, apparently, took off running. I just bolted. I ran and ran to my heart's content. Then I did something even more remarkable. I tripped. And thanks to all the momentum I had built up, I managed to actually fly through the air. Well, a little bit of it anyway. I had thrust myself forward, stretched out my arms, and landed in a skidding motion on the beautiful newly repaved shuttle landing strip. Yup. That was me.

RunwayI, of course, started crying, which alerted the bus driver / tour guide. He rushed over, picked me up, brushed me off, offered a band aid, and proclaimed to the world, that I was indeed the first human to safely return to Earth, using said run way. The rest of the tour people applauded. I got a picture with the tour guide. And I think I even got a plaque commemorating the event.

Perhaps that is why I am feeling a bit 'Aww' about the final shuttle flight.

Comfortably seated, upright landingI am very much looking forward to seeing what happens next. Commercial space will of course fill the gap, and offer space transportation solutions. I do hope more plane type vehicles, rather than capsules, end up on the market. I would much rather be seated comfortably with a window view when I finally venture up there.

Capsule splashdown
The idea of being splashed down upon re-entry in a capsule like vehicle is not quite as appealing as a soft landing in the upright seated position.  That being said, I will take a trip to space in any form that is offered.

 


Here's to the shuttle! For its decades of awesome service, for sparking my curiosity and interest, for all the amazing scientific discoveries and developments its helped us gain, and of course, for the spectacular pictures it has captured on its journeys.







Want to know more? Click the links below!

NASA's Shuttle and Rocket Launch Schedule
NASA's Latest Space Shuttle News
Read about the Space Shuttle from Wikipedia

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Daniel James

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FIRST! (I hadn't achieved much today so I had to take the opportunity)

You have the bestest stories! I wouldn't even be surprised if you met Optimus Prime and the rest of the autobots.

Daniel James

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Let me rephrase that last part: Have you met Optimus Prime and the rest of the Autobots?


Evie
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Why thank you Danny, I'm glad you enjoyed the post. As far as OP goes.. We're having dinner next week. I'll get you an auto-graph! Get it.. 'auto' graph... yea..

Roy L. Carroll

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I just wanted to say that you have pretty much echoed my feelings as well. The shuttle has been flying for 3/4 of my life and it was a major dream of mine to be present for at least one of it's launches, whether on the ground, or more importantly, in the cockpit. Alas, that dream dies tomorrow. I will definitely be watching it on NASA TV and there will be tears shed.

AmoebaMike
Independence Science
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When I was growing up, my stepmom worked at the Cape. She worked on the SRBs. Doing what, I have no idea. But I got to go once for a Family Day type thing. It was awesome. I got to be a few mere feet from a shuttle and a crawler. I remember most vividly seeing the heat shield tiles on the underbelly of the orbiter--you don't get to see those when they show you pictures of the entire body. It was super cool. Living in Florida with space-junkie parents who listened to launches on the radio or watched from the jeddies (or their backyard) was a way to really get a kid into space.

I, too, am very sad to see manned space missions go on hiatus. Sure, the space program won't be dead, but we do learn so much when we send up humans. Between the beaurocratic bloat that all government agencies suffer from and the lack of science education in public schools, it doesn't surprise me at all though.  But it was certainly time to call it quits.  When you look at the shuttle, you're looking at the best technology the 70s had to offer. We knew it was never meant to last this long. But that doesn't make it any less painful to watch.

Evie, if you didn't read my post from the other day, please do so. There is a link to a great image that I think you'll appreciate.

http://amoebamike.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/the-inside-of-a-space-shuttle-flight-deck-the-end-of-an-era/

Raymond Christopher Qual

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I'm heading down tonight.  Plan on heading out at 3 AM and be in the Titusville area between 9 and 10 AM.  I doubt that I'll get as close as I've been for past launches, but at least I'll be in the area to see that giant match lit on the cape. :)  If I'm close enough for photos, I'll put my pictures on Facebook and share them with you!


Evie
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Roy L. Carroll said: I just wanted to say that you have pretty much echoed my feelings as well. The shuttle has been flying for 3/4 of my life and it was a major dream of mine to be present for at least one of it's launches, whether on the ground, or more importantly, in the cockpit. Alas, that dream dies tomorrow. I will definitely be watching it on NASA TV and there will be tears shed.

Roy, I am glad you share my love of space flight, but you shouldn't feel as though the dream had died. There are plenty more space vehicles to come. I am certain you will find a way to watch them launch, and probably end up as a passenger on a ride to two as well.. Perhaps I'll meet you there!


Evie
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AmoebaMike said:

When I was growing up, my stepmom worked at the Cape. She worked on the SRBs. Doing what, I have no idea. But I got to go once for a Family Day type thing. It was awesome. I got to be a few mere feet from a shuttle and a crawler. I remember most vividly seeing the heat shield tiles on the underbelly of the orbiter--you don't get to see those when they show you pictures of the entire body. It was super cool. Living in Florida with space-junkie parents who listened to launches on the radio or watched from the jeddies (or their backyard) was a way to really get a kid into space.

I, too, am very sad to see manned space missions go on hiatus. Sure, the space program won't be dead, but we do learn so much when we send up humans. Between the beaurocratic bloat that all government agencies suffer from and the lack of science education in public schools, it doesn't surprise me at all though.  But it was certainly time to call it quits.  When you look at the shuttle, you're looking at the best technology the 70s had to offer. We knew it was never meant to last this long. But that doesn't make it any less painful to watch.

Evie, if you didn't read my post from the other day, please do so. There is a link to a great image that I think you'll appreciate.

http://amoebamike.wordpress.com/2011/07/04/the-inside-of-a-space-shuttle-flight-deck-the-end-of-an-era/

Mike! Thanks for the link, left you a comment :)

I didn't know you were raised by space junkies! That must have been so totally cool!

I agree w everything you said in your blog, but I am a huge fan of commercial space, and I think good things will be soon to come from that direction.

 


Evie
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Raymond Christopher Qual said:

I'm heading down tonight.  Plan on heading out at 3 AM and be in the Titusville area between 9 and 10 AM.  I doubt that I'll get as close as I've been for past launches, but at least I'll be in the area to see that giant match lit on the cape. :)  If I'm close enough for photos, I'll put my pictures on Facebook and share them with you!

Chris, have a great time down there, I hope you get closer than you think!

Please do share any pictures you get. I would love to see them.

 


Alchemystress
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It really is very bitersweet. Sad to see it go. Also what a great story about your visit to the runway ;)

Milley

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In my opinion space shuttles were the safest of all.Besides the tragic failures of Challenger and Columbia they've taken us to the space safely more than hundred times. Hope they will invent something even safer.


Evie
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Thanks milley, I agree, the shuttle is a great spacecraft. The industry is teaming with new companies and new ideas, this is an exciting time. We get to see what new directions end up making it and becoming the new norm.

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