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Kelly Oakes GBR

I'm an Undergraduate Physics student from Imperial College London, about to start the Masters year of my degree. I mostly write about physics research papers that I find interesting in the hope that other people will find them interesting too. The wordpress version of my blog is here.

My posts are presented as opinion and commentary and do not represent the views of LabSpaces Productions, LLC, my employer, or my educational institution.

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Before arriving in London, each student receives a short description of the room with the possibility to share a room with a number of other independent students. Twin rooms in flat shares are idea. . .Read More
May 25, 2013, 10:42am

The one thing you forgot to mention, the most important thing as far as I'm concerned, is the possibility that dark matter does not exist at all. It could be nothing but a by-product of our means o. . .Read More
Aug 11, 2012, 11:38am
Comment by kinetic energy in Physics is hard!

agreed, the amount of hours people put into their theories is crazy, but all worth it in the end. . . .Read More
Jun 04, 2012, 12:09pm

From Poincare and caos, for modest changes in the initial conditions, the motion of the system becomes chaotic and completely unpredictable. This is impotrtant for viewing two galaxies mix. Three b. . .Read More
Aug 01, 2011, 4:08pm

Poincare find that trhee body don not have mathematical representation. The mix of two galaxies must be a big caso .Or not? . . .Read More
Jul 29, 2011, 11:14pm
Views: 971 | Comments: 2
Last by Kelly Oakes on Feb 24, 2011, 7:42am
You might not be able to tell from wherever you are reading this, but black holes in the distant universe just shrunk down to as little as a tenth of their previous size. This is not some cosmic disappearing act; a new analysis of supermassive black holes at the centres of active galactic nuclei has revealed that their masses were previously overestimated by up to a factor of ten. The paper was published in Nature last week.



Active galactic nuclei, or AGN, are among the most luminous objects in the universe and are powered by massive black holes millions of times the mass of the Sun. Gas clouds, known as “broad line regions” for reasons that will become clear later, surround the black holes. These gas clouds range from a few light daysto hundreds of light days across; they are much wider than our solar system. Astronomers have been studying these clouds for over thirty years, but had not worked out the why some of them were flatter than others — until now.

. . . More
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