banner
You are not using a standards compliant browser. Because of this you may notice minor glitches in the rendering of this page. Please upgrade to a compliant browser for optimal viewing:
Firefox
Internet Explorer 7
Safari (Mac and PC)
Post Archive
2017 (0)
2015 (3)2014 (2)
August (1)

TwitterOauth API delete tweets
Wednesday, August 27, 2014
January (1)

Illumina's $1000 Genome*
Wednesday, January 15, 2014
2013 (4)2012 (6)2011 (21)
October (7)August (3)July (1)

More Troubleshooting
Wednesday, July 13, 2011
June (1)

End to the sonication saga
Tuesday, June 7, 2011
May (1)April (2)March (4)

Thwart the NYtimes paywall
Thursday, March 17, 2011

Circle of life
Thursday, March 17, 2011

Curing a plague: Cryptocaryon irritans
Wednesday, March 9, 2011

Video: First new fish in 6 months!!
Wednesday, March 2, 2011
February (1)January (1)
2010 (13)
December (3)

The first step is the most important
Thursday, December 30, 2010

Have we really found a stem cell cure for HIV?
Wednesday, December 15, 2010

This paper saved my graduate career
Tuesday, December 14, 2010
November (3)

Valium or Sex: How do you like your science promotion
Tuesday, November 23, 2010

A wedding pic.
Tuesday, November 16, 2010

To rule by terror
Tuesday, November 9, 2010
October (2)September (5)

Hiccupping Hubris
Wednesday, September 22, 2010

A death in the family :(
Monday, September 20, 2010

The new lab fish!
Friday, September 10, 2010

What I wish I knew...Before applying to graduate school
Tuesday, September 7, 2010

Stopping viruses by targeting human proteins
Tuesday, September 7, 2010
Rate This Post
Total votes: 1
Blogger Profile

Brian Krueger, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center
New York NY USA

Brian Krueger is the owner, creator and coder of LabSpaces by night and Next Generation Sequencer by day. He is currently the Director of Genomic Analysis and Technical Operations for the Institute for Genomic Medicine at Columbia University Medical Center. In his blog you will find articles about technology, molecular biology, and editorial comments on the current state of science on the internet.

My posts are presented as opinion and commentary and do not represent the views of LabSpaces Productions, LLC, my employer, or my educational institution.

Blog RSS Feed
RSS Add to My Yahoo Add to Google
Recent Comments

jika anda ingin tahu tutorial cara membuat brosur sendiri bisa lihat di panduannya disini. dan jika anda ingin tahu Read More
Mar 24, 2017, 2:50am
Comment by jasa desain logo profesi in Antineoplastons? You gotta be kidding me!

i like kidding by jasa desain logo online paling murah . . .Read More
Mar 24, 2017, 2:44am
Comment by best love quotes in Antineoplastons? You gotta be kidding me!

Here we are providing the best love quotes in industry. Every individual can send the cute beautiful loving sexy kissing sexy images for there girlfriend and boyfriend and other loved ones like: gi. . .Read More
Mar 21, 2017, 12:21pm

Batas waktu pelaporan SPT Tahunan pajak penghasilan untuk WP Perorangan adalah 31 Maret 2017, Apakah Anda sudah menyampaikan laporan SPT atas penghasilan yang diperoleh selama tahun 2016? Jika ingi. . .Read More
Mar 20, 2017, 8:28pm

nice article very good thanks Paket Umroh Ramadhan 2017 . . .Read More
Mar 20, 2017, 9:40am
Monday, September 20, 2010

I came into lab yesterday to a disaster. I took a look at my quarantine tank and it was filled with a white bacterial bloom, the bottom of the tank was covered in what looked like leftover food and fish poop, and the water smelled like rotting fish. To top it off, the Powder Blue Tang could not right itself, and was swimming upside down and in circles. For those of you that have never owned fish, upside down and in circles is usually referred to as the "death roll." The yellow longnose butterfly fish seemed just fine though. I have absolutely no clue why there were feces and food all over the tank. I'm the only person in lab that messes with the fish and everyone knows that if they touch anything to do with the tanks without asking me, they're liable to get their hands whacked off with the guillotine paper cutter. Both fish were doing just fine when I left them on Saturday and did their daily feeding and tank cleaning. The presence of the amount of food and feces in the tank was very surprising. I do a 25% water change EVERYDAY on this tank AFTER feeding to clean up any uneaten food and feces from the night before. I'm convinced someone messed with it, because there's no other explanation. I rushed to do a massive water change. This involved making up 15 gallons of fresh saltwater, heating it to the right temperature for an hour and then slowly adding it to the tank to acclimate the fish to the new conditions. Neither fish was happy during this process and the Tang looked to be getting worse by the minute. After replacing 75% of the water, I waited an hour and did another 50% water change, just to be sure whatever was causing the odd behavior was completely diluted out. I assumed the Tang's behavior was due to either a swim bladder infection (nearly incurable) or ammonia toxicity. I left the lab to go home and figured I'd find the tang dead in the morning.



I came in today and the tang is doing fine, but the butterfly fish died. WTF!!! You can see a red patch on its side in the picture that could be a battle scar from a fight with the powder blue tang, but I've seen no aggression between the two fish in the week that I've had them. This death is very odd, I thought for sure that the Powder Blue Tang was the goner. I guess its possible that the yellow longnose butterfly fish had some other disease that was aggravated by the stress of a ~90% water change. This is one of the few things that sucks about owning a saltwater fish tank. I hate it when fish die and I don't know why :(

This post has been viewed: 1111 time(s)

Blog Comments

Evie
Rate Post:

Like 1 Dislike
I think you need a fish tank spy cam.

Gerty-Z
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
That really sucks! Huge bummer.

Nikkilina
Washington University School of Medicine
Rate Post:

Like 1 Dislike
Weird. You should go all CSI and dust for prints. According to my TV, you'll know who did it, what happened and what they had for breakfast in about 3.75 minutes.

Brian Krueger, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
@Nikkilina, Haha, or if I had a shitty security camera I could just super zoom on the water reflection to get a picture perfect image of the perp's face :P

I just hope the powder blue tang makes it. It looked ok today, but its still very stressed. It has white stress blotches all over its body :(

Februa
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
So, you cleaned the tank on Saturday and it was filled with feces on Monday, and to you this means someone messed with it. I can follow that logic, but sounds to me like you are suggesting someone collected up some fish feces over time, stored them in secret, and then sneakily managed to re-add them to the tank yesterday in your absence, filling the tank with feces to sabotage your fish, which is some *serious* hatred from a lab mate....yikes

Prof-like Substance
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
That sucks, I hate it when fish die. But what size is the tank? Tough to do saltwater in less than 50gal. It's not so much the water changes as the fluctuations in the chemistry variables that can fuck the fish up. You probably know this, though.

Brian Krueger, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
I've been doing saltwater for 5 years now. I had a 120 gallon reef tank in my basement in Iowa. When I moved to Florida, we bought a house with wood floors. My fiancee saw how much water I spilled all over the place in Iowa and said, "NO!" But my new boss here let me set up a 75 gallon reef tank in the lab :)

Definitely the bigger the tank, the more stable the chemistry, but chemistry in my experience is really only a problem for inverts and corals. The fish are pretty bullet proof as long as you have the nitrogen cycle under control. Obviously, the nitrogen cycle got hosed in my 20 gallon quarantine tank. Most fish (excluding angels, moorish idols, and Acanthurus sp tangs - like the powder blue :P) are oblivious to salinity (as long as it's above 11ppt or 1.010SG), pH between 7 and 9, and temperature between 72 and 86. I guess it could have been an issue of over stocking, but that tank should be able to support at least 10 inches of fish, and the two fish that were in there were 3 inches each. It's a mystery to me, but I'm still suspecting foul play. The other 4 fish in the 75g display all survived quarantine in it :) I'm just surprised the butterfly fish died. They're extremely hardy fish in my experience.

Brian Krueger, PhD
Columbia University Medical Center
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
The powder blue tang looks normal today and the water tests show the tank is stable again. I'm pretty freaking annoyed (but it's good both fish didn't die :) ).

Nikkilina
Washington University School of Medicine
Rate Post:

Like 0 Dislike
Glad you got it under control.
Add Comment?
Comments are closed 2 weeks after initial post.
Friends